Go to the Light – Start Exit Planning Now

“I don’t know where I’m going, but I’m making good time.” – Quote from a former client.

I just completed a series of discussions with some mature business owners on potential exits from their businesses. As usual, I tend to take away common themes and I thought of this quote from a former client. He used it to describe people he had encountered who were so absorbed in what they were doing, they thought they were making progress.

Through his eyes, he thought they were lost. The latter tended to describe these owners. Each had a valid reason to address the need for exit planning – age, paradigm changes, timing – these were all present and culprits in raising the very thorny question as to “What’s next?” There is an abundance of tools to help an owner through the exit process, but getting started – now there’s the rub.

I hear loads of excuses as to reasons to delay. Many who advise in this space have what are perceived of as ulterior motives – money managers who want owners to sell so they can manage their liquid assets, life insurance sales people who want to make sure owners and their families have the annuity or insurance to cover them as they go on their journey, etc. Unfortunately, while well intended, they give the owner an out by raising questions regarding true intent. I have had some success in this space because I do not care what the result is, I just want to make sure that an owner has all the facts before they make their decision. But I will admit, it is a tough battle.

Having said that, I believe the major reasons for delay are psychological. Fear is often downplayed and yet I think it is one root cause of most owners becoming part of the majority who either have no exit plan or start to plan too late. In his 2000 Year Old Man albums, Mel Brooks cited fear as the great motivator for everything from transportation to the development of the handshake and dancing. One problem for the owner is often the absence of someone they can confide in to discuss their fears. Often seen as the patriarch or matriarch, showing fear is often perceived by them as a sign of weakness. So, they seek solace in finding a solution. This keeps them busy and avoids the need to discuss the obvious – starting an exit plan.

The absence of a “life” after the business is gone is also an issue. Often left with little time to develop hobbies or other interests, the lack of something to go to leads the owner to complacency about staying where they are. Making the business stronger is a great defense and considered “progress” perhaps ignoring at times risks like the paradigm shift which may be too great to overcome.

So, to owners, I say start the process now. Have others tell you it is too early, but I never think it is. My advice has always been not to get into a business without knowing how you will get out. Also, find an advisor you can trust. They do not have to be skilled in the exit process, but they have to be capable of listening and telling you things you may not want to hear. With some guidance, you will know where you are going and have a successful completion to your journey.

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Stages of a Business Life Cycle – Why It Matters Where You Are

“Where you stand depends on where you sit.” – quote attributed to Rufus Miles of Princeton University

I have been privileged to serve businesses in all stages of their life cycle. For example, I am now helping an owner sell the business I helped him to acquire over 30 years ago. Over the years, I have helped companies deal with a wide variety of issues and realize the commonality is often the current stage of the life of that business. More importantly, focusing on “where you stand” in the cycle can help an owner address the typical issues they will probably face not only in this stage but the next. It’s the old “I am more afraid of what I don’t know” syndrome I see so often. So while a complete listing of what to consider at each stage is way beyond the scope of any blog or article, some brief highlights will get you thinking.

It may have been the Boston Consulting Group or another organization which introduced this concept (or a derivation thereof) years ago, but to me there are typically four stages of the business life cycle:

  1. Startup
  2. Emerging
  3. Growth
  4. Mature

Startups are characterized by developing proof of concept, they are pre-revenue, may have a minimum viable product (MVP) and the owners are usually trying to define themselves. Challenges are funding, funding, funding (angels, friends and family), sharing equity and recruiting team members (usually centered around those that believe in the founder(s) vision.)

Emerging companies do have an MVP, some traction, and are looking to develop an effective approach to the market. They have raised funds from friends and family and are looking for that next round. Challenges are more sophisticated funding (VC’s, etc.), honing the customer experience, the product and approach, expanding the team, more disciplined equity grants and trying to keep control over everything – – being a bit more “directed” but monitoring culture.

Growth is when you start to hit stride. Product is developed and is appealing to the sweet spot of the market. Financing is less of an issue and you probably have cash flow to fund basic growth: your balance sheet is your friend. Team members are now recruited with more specific objectives in mind. Equity is more guarded (like a fine wine) and delegation and timely reporting of Key Performance Indicators replaces informal chats as to “how things are going.” Discipline works its way into almost all aspects of the business and controls (versus control) is the key word of the day. Organic versus acquisition growth is a constant subject of discussion.

Mature companies have usually achieved stability in market presence, financial rewards and in management team composition. Thoughts turn to succession planning, risk management (protecting what you have built) and perhaps an exit plan. Processes are helping keep the business intact and acquisitions and dispositions are a more frequent part of the conversation.

So there are issues to address at each stage in the life cycle, and at times, owners get a bit ahead of themselves like adolescents tend to do. Hopefully, by identifying where you are in the process and understanding that where you stand depends on where you sit, you will be able to successfully see your way through it.