The Perfect Pitch Works

“He cared; more than Harvey Ramos” – quote from this blog’s author.

I know what you are thinking – he has run out of quotes so now he is quoting himself. So before you get the wrong impression, let me explain.

As part of instructor training at EY, we were told at cocktails when we arrived that the next day, we would be asked to introduce ourselves with the proviso that our presentation had to end with what we wanted scripted on our tombstone. (BTW I suggest you try this sometime.) Well I tossed and turned that night and after trying what I felt were thousands of iterations, I finally settled on “he cared.”

The next day we are going through our presentations and preceding me is Harvey. He comes to the end and announces that his tombstone will read “he cared.” The instructor thanks Harvey and immediately calls on me. My readers are pretty smart so you know how this concluded. So why the long lead in?

If nothing else, this exercise caused me to reflect deeply on what I really wanted to say about my life in simple terms and owners do the same for their company each time they make a pitch for investment. Lately, I have been through a couple of failed funding attempts and I wanted to better understand why investors said “no.” I reached out to some of the investors that passed and also saw a couple of recent articles on the subject. Always searching for a new angle, I gathered about a dozen or so different reasons but was disappointed to find they really had not changed in the last four decades. Some common culprits:

  • Barriers to entry not highlighted
  • KPI failure – either don’t know them, they are poorly defined or poorly measured
  • Shallow knowledge of competition – and the always fatal “we have no competition”
  • Economics – not clear how investment will be used or no “paying” sales channel presented
  • All OPM – where was founders’ buy-in?

I then looked at our “Perfect Pitch” guidelines (available @ withum.com) and realized all these points would have been addressed had the founders done a deep dive into what they were presenting. To draw the analogy, had they invested the same level of thought into what their pitch “said” as I had in doing the simple tombstone exercise, all of these points would have been addressed.

Your “pitch” is your chance to show your best. I really do not care if you use what has worked for us over the years or another guide, when you are preparing it, invest the time to completely address what is suggested – – there is a reason for it. This is not the same as being at a New Jersey diner and spending the time figuring out what you want from the hundreds of items on the menu. This is not a checklist; it is a starting point for you to shape the future of the economic life of your company.

So please when you put the meat on the bones of your pitch, think about what it says about you and your company; what it stands for and what it represents. Don’t get turned down just because you did not do your homework. Think about how an investor sees it, because properly prepared, the Perfect Pitch does work. Good luck.

Advertisements

Getting Your Pitch on the Right Page

“I am them, they are me, we are all singing, I have the mouth.” – a line from Fabiola, a Mel Brooks character.

So another week of reviewing pitch decks has passed, and as the saying goes, “The more things change; the more they stay the same.” I like to reflect on my comments on decks from the last week or two and search for commonality. This week seemed to indicate that founders are struggling a bit expressing their vision.

Here are some ideas that may help:

  • Don’t be too esoteric. Much like the Mel Brooks character above, don’t hide your vision by burying it in language which makes the reader feel like they have to interpret Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave” in order to get your point. Instead, state clearly the nature of the problem you are solving. You may think the correct interpretation of your pitch will result in investment, but be careful. That sound you hear may just be indigestion.
  • Try to avoid repeating. Once you have outlined the problem and solution, assume the reader can follow and will move on. Having to repeat your key concepts more than once (save for in the body and closing) may not add value to the investment thesis.
  • Less is more. Related to the previous subject, a deck should be no more than 20 or so slides. It is a vision piece, not courtroom evidence or a master’s thesis. I would suggest a useful exercise from my college communications course – pretend each word costs you $1,000; then review your pitch with the goal of cutting costs.
  • Acronyms can confuse. In an attempt to show your market prowess, using abbreviations may showcase your industry knowledge, but is every investor as in tune as you are? You want people to know when you use AI that you are talking about artificial intelligence and not aortic insufficiency, so words may trump abbreviations.
  • Show a picture. I do believe a picture is worth 1,000 words but I believe value is conveying the right ones. Have a simple visual of the customer, your product and the problem with limited notes that highlight the interplay. When I explain succession planning, I now find it is easily understood when I show three intersecting circles representing family, management and ownership. We relate better to something we can see.
  • Practice, practice, practice. You have to start by making your pitch in front of family, friends or advisors. Start with the request that they point out at least one or two things they would do differently if they were making the pitch. Honest feedback is worth its weight in gold.

Please keep in mind that the more eyes who see and honestly comment on your pitch, the better it will be. It is crucial to make sure that while you do not want to lose your vision; if others cannot see it (aka be on the same page), you will probably be disappointed in the value your deck brings. Simple steps like the above can bring you an improved result.

Show Me The Money – The Question Early Stage Fund Seekers Are Afraid to Ask

“Fundraising is the gentle art of teaching the joy of giving.” Quote from Henry A. Rosso – fund raising master

Over a long Holiday weekend, I had the chance to read through and comment on a handful of pitch decks. It may have been my good mood, but I really think the quality of these decks is getting better especially as it relates to early stage fundraisers including most of the basic components of a solid deck. There are plenty of guides out there to show what the contents of a deck should be – – in fact we have a good one at our Withum website if you just go to withum.com and search for “pitch deck.” So as Mona Lisa Vito from My Cousin Vinny would say, “So, what’s the problem?”

Despite the better quality, I was amazed to see that except for one deck, there was reluctance for these companies to address the “proverbial elephant in the room” – – namely stating how much money they are looking for and how they are going to use it. It appears to be like the fear of asking someone out on that first date.

So for our fundraising friends out there, here are five simple Dos and Don’ts when it comes to covering the “ask” in pitches:

  1. Do tell investors how much money you are looking for. Be clear about how much and how you are willing to layer rounds in, say as you achieve certain milestones.
  2. Do support this amount with summary (and detail if requested) calculations including a reasonable reconciliation to your basic cash flow. Provide a summary phrase that is descriptive of each major goal. A phrase like “develop a mobile app” is more helpful than “ramp up operations.”
  3. Do indicate to investors your flexibility as to form of investment. If you are comfortable with convertible notes, or SAFE documents or prefer a straight common stock investment, help guide a potential investor.
  4. Don’t show funds will be used to settle old debts or for significant owner salaries. Paying off old problems like existing debt or back pay does not move a business forward. Setting aside an amount for some minimum salary / payment to owners for their survival is not fatal but it probably helps if this can be avoided.
  5. Don’t imply this amount of funds is all you will need unless your projections clearly indicate this to be the case. Nobody likes the gift that keeps on giving. It is a frustration for investors and it is better to state upfront where you expect to be once the money is spent and how you will be positioned for the next stage of your growth.

The punchline here is not to forget the punchline. Just think about telling a long story and leaving that all important ending out. Listeners will look at you quizzically – – they expect – – in fact they demand you bring the story to a close. It is the same with your pitch deck. Potential investors want to know the punchline – – what do you need and how are you going to use it? Teach them the joy of giving.

Your Pitch Deck – It Really Is A Test

“You talkin’ to me?” –  Travis Bickle (Robert DeNiro ) – Taxi Driver, the movie

So, what is the real purpose of preparing a pitch deck?  Like everyone else, I have a format I like to follow.  In fact, you can find it on our website  – we call it the Perfect Pitch (get it, sports fans?)  It includes everything from a suggested order of slides to hints on what to say before and after your pitch and even some helpful hints on shading and color schemes.  But, is that really what this is all about?  Will the concepts and opportunity you craft into 21 slides really land you an investment?

Well, I for one think it is a required exercise, but perhaps not for the reasons you think. To me, this process is nothing but a test – a challenge to see how you and your team think collectively.  Business is tough; the only thing certain is change and investors want to get a feel for how you and your team think.  So, let’s drill down on this a bit and peel back the onion on a few critical components of a pitch.

Competition –a basic concept; how do you measure up against others?  Think about it.  If you don’t know a “player” in your space, what does that tell an investor about the depth of your market knowledge?  And, suppose the investor brings up a new unknown competitor.  Isn’t the way you react to that news tell the investor something about how successfully you might face such a challenge tomorrow?

Financials – everybody wants to measure the opportunity.  But, do you think most investors focus in on the details of your projections or is it more important to show them how you conceptualize revenue streams and cost structure?  I just reviewed a plan where revenue from year 2 to year 3 grew by $20 million and costs by $200,000.  Nice work if you can get it – but, I am pretty sure that logic (or lack of it) will not get you a passing grade.

Competitive Advantage – what makes your product unique – what real pain does it alleviate and what prevents a newcomer from knocking you off?  Everyone suspects this can and will happen but how do you present your thought process for dealing with this; for keeping ahead of others?

So, at the end of the day, an investor wants to know that you are “talkin’ to them.”  But, it is not just words – it is conversation. They want to get a feel for what makes you tick and how you will address the unknown.  This is not a multiple choice test; it is an essay.  So, concentrate on the message and what you want to say; emphasize the “brain power” of your team and I am sure you will pass the test with flying colors.