Team Building: Ideas to Keep in Mind

“There is no I in TEAM.” – attribution unknown

The importance of a management team to the success of any venture is a well-known business fact. I have blogged about this in the past and it has been the key focal point of investors for years. So given the fact that no man is an island and one needs a team to succeed, a great question for an early stage entrepreneur is where do you start?

I have had the chance to build a number of successful teams in my career but more importantly, I have watched some truly accomplished entrepreneurs build them on a greater scale and with much better results. So when I reflect on what seemed to work for all of us, I kept coming back to five ideas I would suggest you keep in mind as you start the most important task you have as a leader – – building the right team:

1. Think leaders and creators. One of my favorite clients would often remark that an idea of mine was “counterintuitive” and that is what you might be thinking here. You may feel that you are the leader, so maybe these traits are not as important for team members. The point is most businesses successfully build to scale by having a series of teams who use their creative capabilities to solve problems. If you need any proof of that, just read about NASA and the race to land on the moon.

2. Look for the same culture but different skill sets. My advice is culture trumps economics every time. So if you want to build a real team, make sure your key members share a common culture – that comfortable work environment, transparency and a sense of what is right and what is wrong that can overcome the absence of short-term financial rewards.

3. Those who share your vision are good; those that share your passion are great. I have mentioned in the past my client who used the phrase “I always admired a man who can stand up and say, you said it chief.” Everyone will see through someone who is a blind supporter of your vision or worse yet, overly passionate about it. Do not force this; spend the time to make sure each key team member is on the same page. I would prefer serious and dedicated strong silent support over the shallow cheerleader any day.

4. Seek those who seek challenges. The shortest and easiest road is not always the best. The odds of having to pivot at least once along the way is high and that means change, and change is a challenge many do not like to face. While being supportive is important, it is better to have members on the team who have the inner strength to help correct the ship versus fight a required change in direction.

5. Share the pie. How you do this is up to you. Whether you choose to reward every team member (I call it the chicken in every pot approach) or those leaders and drivers having the most impact, make sure you think of and reward those most responsible for helping you on your journey.

So there they are – – hopefully, some helpful ideas you can use as you build your team. And please try to avoid that self-centered promoting type even if they have a skill set that you need. That person never gets the point that there is no I in team.

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Leadership – Five Easy Steps

“They are my people! I am their sovereign! I LOVE them. Pull!” – King Louis quote from “History of the World” by Mel Brooks

For many Brooks’ fans, this classic scene epitomizes what it is like not to be a leader; turning one’s subjects into human clay pigeons for sheer pleasure. Fortunately for all of us, there are many great leaders – – some of whom we encounter in our everyday lives and some who just seem to step up when a situation or opportunity presents itself. It is much more than just staying positive and checking your happiness quotient. I, and others, have blogged in the past about traits and characteristics that are common to both respected and poor leaders. But what about some simple, practical advice you can use every day to become more effective in a leadership role?

Here are five easy leadership steps to consider:

    • Know thyself – One of the best tools I ever employed was the Myers-Briggs test. Finding out my “personality” type allowed me to better understand why I acted and reacted in certain ways and helped me to modify my style. But more importantly, it allowed me to better understand my peers, colleagues and fellow team members and how to more effectively work and communicate with them.
    • Read, read, read – Delve into the case studies and books of those who were great leaders. Learn effective habits and traits to help you negotiate through difficult issues and roadblocks. You do not have to become a disciple of Covey, but understanding concepts such as his will make you stronger.
    • Have a style – You have to work in a manner which makes you comfortable. You may be more of a taskmaster or perhaps a cheerleader, but being consistent allows others to better understand you and builds their confidence in you. There is no need to drastically change to a style that is not you; others will see right through it and your effectiveness as a leader will suffer.
    • Hold others accountable – They say leadership is hard to define, but you know it when you see it. Holding people accountable for their actions and responsibilities is one way of demonstrating this. You do not need to micro-manage or constantly be on your team’s “case,” but a firm, periodic assessment of status goes a long way toward showing you are an effective leader.
    • Admit and address mistakes; celebrate success – Balance here is the answer. Too often, the person in charge spends too much time on one and too little on the other. Perhaps the most difficult but endearing trait is admitting you made a mistake. The typical excuse (usually self- imposed) is you will appear to be a less effective leader if you do something wrong. Keep in mind the famous saying, “That’s why they put erasers on pencils.” And celebrate the “wins”; everyone takes pride in an accomplishment.

So there you have it. Not exactly the complete recipe for being an effective leader but some simple, practical steps you can take each day on your journey to success.

Leadership; You Will Know It When You See It

“I always admired a subordinate who could stand up and say ‘you said it, chief.’” – quote from a long-time entrepreneurial client

We have all had experience with leaders, and I would be the first to admit that I openly copied the leadership traits of those I admired. The above quote came from a client years ago as I was asking how he instilled the “followship” that is an important part of leadership. His backhanded comment was a reminder of the fact that without some respect (admiration and even fear), the effectiveness of a leader can be somewhat diminished.

I thought about this when I recently attended a session / presentation on leadership. A panel of successful leaders responded to questions and provided some guidance on this topic to the audience. As enlightening as it was, I was somewhat taken aback by the commonality of the message on leadership. While each took their turn at eloquently explaining what they believed a leader was, none captured more than one or two elements of what I thought made a leader. It was at that point that I realized that no definition could capture the wide range of effective leaders I have known.

What I also began to realize as I reflected on my role models was that it was an event or opportunity that allowed that person to become a leader in my eyes. It was action more than executive presence that defined them for me. While I had known most of my leaders and knew what they were capable of, it was an event that brought out their best. Two situations, both related to initial public offerings (IPO) come to mind.

If you have ever been involved in an IPO process, you know it is one of the most intense processes known to man. While not quite like sending someone to the moon, it relies on very timely coordination and execution from a diverse team to come to the right point in time where everyone can “sign off” and give the go signal. At times, that window is only open a day or two at best and if you miss it, you have to revisit the process. At the time of this decision, expectations are high as are the attendant professional fees.

In two separate cases, we were at that go or no-go point and each CEO stepped up and determined the time was not right and the deal was pulled. In one case, it was an experienced professional manager who had been through the process before, but in the other case, it was a business owner with a very unsophisticated business who saw certain parties in the process being pushed to the edge of the envelope. While he was not sure what was going on (and he had the most at risk) he sensed it was not right and stopped the presses.

Crisis, personal issues, conflicts, financial distress, loss of major customer – – I have seen various owners respond to these traumatic events, but it was the true leaders who did not let the situation control them but stepped up to show they were leaders. It was obvious to all present that they saw leadership.

So, as an owner, be prepared to show you a leader. You may in fact be a good mentor and coach to your team, but when the opportunity presents itself, be prepared to step up and do the right thing. The ultimate success of your company may depend on it.