Equity Plans Part II – Are We There Yet?

Most of you will recognize this oft repeated question which parents have heard for years. Popularized in the movie and television show by the same name as well as the movie Shrek, it is the question that sends a chill down any parent’s spine; especially when asked by a 5-year old on a long road trip. So why do I use it here especially considering Part I of this blog cited “the time has come” from Dr. Seuss? Well as they say, timing is everything and so it is with Equity Plans as well. So let me explain.

Very few people would ask someone to marry them after just one or two dates, even if they believe that person may be the “love of their life.” Yet I deal with loads of startups where the second conversation an owner has with a key potential hire turns to sharing ownership. Worse yet, without thinking through what they are offering, many offer too much equity only to find they lack enough for others (fast forward to “The Producers” by Mel Brooks – “what percent of Springtime for Hitler do they own?”) or worse yet; that key hire does not work out.

So I spend a great deal of time fixing these issues and there is nothing enjoyable about it. Legal agreements are usually incomplete; the process turns into a he said he said deal and then there are tax consequences to muscle through. It always comes down to having a well-documented equity plan and in all cases, the company “wasn’t there yet.”

So what do I advise? Very simply, have a plan. (You can look at my blog of December 19, 2013 Equity Sharing 101 for Startups for more guidance.) Of course a good attorney is the key here and while many of the documents are somewhat “boilerplate,” you must have a handle on the key provisions. So two quick cases.

In the first, a CTO was brought into a startup, and within a month, the CEO thought enough of him to offer him 10% of the Company in “Founders’ Shares” (no vesting). The CTO was focused more on coding than job satisfaction and within a year, realized he did not want to be there anymore. Fortunately, the CTO was so focused on getting out he never considered the potential value of what he had, and he basically gave back the shares and moved on. No agreements were in place; that CEO just lucked out.

In the second case, it was a similar fact pattern except the key person granted equity had been there a bit longer and felt he had substantially contributed to the Company in the five years he was there. This was another case of an early grant of equity and no provisions for separation. There was a falling out and a “settlement” is still in process. The CEO is spending a great deal of emotional time addressing this not to mention legal and consulting bills. It is not a pretty sight.

So please consider a bit of a delay to provide time for thought to make sure “you are there” before you enter an equity plan. But once you decide, move quickly and purposefully in concluding your plan and getting it all signed and delivered.

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